Low-Calorie Sweeteners Q&A

A low-calorie sweetener provides consumers with a sweet taste without the calories or carbohydrates that come with sugar and other caloric sweeteners. Some low-calorie sweeteners, such as aspartame, are “nutritive,” but are low in calories because of their intense sweetness. Many non-nutritive sweeteners, such as saccharin, are non-caloric because they are not metabolized and pass through the body unchanged. Currently, acesulfame potassium, aspartame, saccharin and sucralose are the only available low-calorie sweeteners in the United States.

Why do people crave sweetness?
How is the desire for sweetness satisfied?
What is the ideal sweetener?
What is a 'low-calorie' sweetener?
Is there a need for low-calorie sweeteners?
What are the benefits and limitations of aspartame?
Is aspartame safe?
What are the benefits and limitations of saccharin?
Is saccharin safe?
What are the benefits and limitations of acesulfame potassium?
Is acesulfame potassium safe?
What about the low-calorie sweetener, sucralose?
What is stevia?
What is the difference between stevia, rebaudioside A and steviol glycosides?
Why is there a need for more than one low-calorie sweetener?
How does the 'multiple sweetener approach' benefit consumers?
Is there an advantage to using more than one sweetener in a product?
What additional low-calorie sweeteners might be available in the future?
What quantities of low-calorie sweeteners are consumed each year?
How do low-calorie sweeteners receive regulatory approval?
Do consumers want reduced-calorie foods and beverages?
Why do people consume low-calorie products?
Are low-calorie foods and beverages useful in controlling weight?
How many calories can be saved by using low-calorie, sugar-free products?
What products are low-calorie sweeteners used in?
What are some future low-calorie product possibilities?
Will the search for the ideal low-calorie sweetener continue?

Sweet Choices: Questions & Answers about Sweeteners in Low-Calorie Foods and Beverages