What are the functional reasons that sweet/fructose/sugar are...

Fructose: Not Just a Sweetener By Rosanne Rust MS, RDN, LDN  —  Most people think of sugar as a sweetener. Your patients may be getting a lot of mixed messages about how much sugar they can have in their diets. Information they glean from popular press or magazines often dilutes...

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Study Summary – Chronic Fructose Substitution Has Little...

An article entitled “Chronic fructose substitution for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages has little effect on fasting blood glucose, insulin, or triglycerides: a systematic review and meta-analysis” by Evans et al. was recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The systematic review addressed the effect of...

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Managing Your Child’s Sweet Tooth

By: Ellen Stokes, MS, RD, LD -- “Olivia loves sugar so much that if she had her way, she would live off of gummy bears and popsicles,” her frustrated mother said. “You’re a dietitian – tell me – is that normal?” Normal? Yes.  Challenging?  Absolutely! Concerned parents may believe their...

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Meta-Analysis of Sugar and Type 2 diabetes Published

Tsilas et al., present research findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis in the article “Relation of total sugars, fructose and sucrose with incident type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies” published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The authors evaluated data from 9 publications...

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Addressing Weight Control: Are You Asking Your Patients...

Why Do People Eat What they Eat? By Rosanne Rust MS, RDN, LDN  — When working with patients, dietitians are trained to evaluate the nutrition status of clients, reviewing everything from medical history, to biochemical and anthropometric data, to lifestyle habits and dietary intake. We determine the best diet for...

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Summary of “Fructose replacement of glucose or sucrose...

For your information, an article entitled “Fructose replacement of glucose or sucrose in food or beverages lowers postprandial glucose and insulin without raising triglycerides: a systematic review and meta-analysis” by Evans et al. was recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the present study, Evans et al....

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